An Update on COVID-19

Illustration+of+a+girl+thinking+about+life

Emi Lew

Illustration of a girl thinking about life

Emi Lew, Staff Writer

No more masks, no more distancing, and more owl pride. This year is about introducing a new normal, blending tradition with modifications.

“It feels more like a normal campus now- that’s what I hoped for,” Middle and High School Principal Dwayne Priester said.

It is not only the everyday routine that makes a typical school ground, but it is also the events that are held.

“We are going to return to our activities, having big activities in the gym, having dances, having athletic events that can have spectators, having all of our dance and music concerts and clubs in person,” Leigh Fitzgerald said.

However, this does not mean that everything will be returning exactly as it was before.

The Mid-Pacific community has grown and learned a lot over the pandemic. COVID-19 forced everyone to take a step back and reevaluate the safety of their surroundings and the systems in place. Now, it is impossible to return with the same consciousness.

This means that certain rules and procedures won’t be going anywhere.

Protocols of approving field trips, the ways in which the environment is evaluated and the option to wear masks will be staying. With that logic in place, while many past events will be brought back in the future, they may be modified to keep the community safe.

Health has always been the number one priority of Mid-Pacific- this includes mental health.

During the peak of COVID-19, many students faced difficulties with being unable to participate in extracurricular activities or see their friends. The amount of distance that has been placed between everyone is not something that can retreat quickly.

I’ve been able to talk to them a lot more but then it’s pretty distant because I haven’t talked to them in a really long time,”

— senior Mari Muramoto

“I’ve been able to talk to them a lot more but then it’s pretty distant because I haven’t talked to them in a really long time,” senior Mari Muramoto said.

Still, being in person has helped. Students are able to eat lunch with their friends, socialize in their classes and walk through campus together.

“Calling [my friends] isn’t the same as meeting them in person,” junior Kailey Furuta said.

The future holds many events and even more opportunities to create long-lasting bonds with one another.

“I’m looking forward to graduating. I’m also looking forward to all the new senior events that are coming up, and I’m excited to play with our orchestra,” Muramoto said.