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Fortnite: Wildly popular online game could be fading at Mid-Pacific

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Fortnite: Wildly popular online game could be fading at Mid-Pacific

Fortnite could be losing popularity at Mid-Pacific. Illustration by contributing artist Rell Uehara.

Fortnite could be losing popularity at Mid-Pacific. Illustration by contributing artist Rell Uehara.

Fortnite could be losing popularity at Mid-Pacific. Illustration by contributing artist Rell Uehara.

Fortnite could be losing popularity at Mid-Pacific. Illustration by contributing artist Rell Uehara.

By Maia D’Amato, Staff writer

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On the Mid-Pacific campus last school year, it seemed as though like nearly every student was playing Fortnite. 

Conversations about “early access” and “teaming up” could be heard filtering through the hallways, and during lunch or free periods, students could be seen on their iPads playing the game with each other. 

Fortnite, an online free multiplayer video game produced by Epic Games, has topped over 125 million downloads since its release on July 25, 2017. Fortnite; Battle Royale, requires players to survive, collect resources and try to stay alive for as long as possible. 

According to reports from the Wall Street Journal, the game had 200 million registered players worldwide, up 60 percent from 125 million in June. It is also the most-watched game on Amazon’s live streaming service Twitch, according to industry analyst Newzoo.

Although downloading the game is free, players can spend money to buy “skins” for their character or harvesting tools. 

Shortly after the game’s release for IOS, it was blocked. The school implemented its web filter for all iPads in the beginning of 2017-2018 and it prevents Fortnite from working, in addition to several other apps, said Brian Grantham. 

“It’s gained popularity because it appeals to all audience like children and adults, so the game gets everybody,” said junior Keoni Han. 

Han said he plays Fortnite for about 35 hours per week and finds the game very fun and addicting. The building aspect of the game makes it different from any other games, he said. Building materials like wood and metal are used to create defensive forts.

For consistent gamers, the game may never die, said senior Breyndon Nakamura. But in the eyes of others, the game may seem like its ran its course. 

“It was such a huge success and then now there’s not too much talk about it anymore,” said junior Jonah Marutani.

The release of Battle Royale–in September, 2017– attracted millions of players, but the talk may not always last. Junior Ryder Juliano, who is a Fortnite player on the weekends, doesn’t find the game as in-demand as it was in the beginning of the year.

“I think it’s popular but not like last year where everyone was talking about it,” he said.

As time goes on, the popularity that the game once had seems to be steadily declining on the Mid-Pacific campus. 

According to the web site Newsweek, In March, Fortnite generated $223 million in March, gaining an average of $1.8 million a day. No other month since then has topped it. 

“It may not have had a huge decline in popularity so far, but it’s become more of a given that people play it,” said senior Piankhi Robertson-Chambers. 

Chambers isn’t a fortnite gamer. Since everyone is playing fortnite, not much talk is needed due to playing the game has become a fact, said Chambers. 

High-school students said that gradually over time, new games are coming in and are taking the place of Fortnite. Now, middle schoolers might be taking over it.

“I see some people play but mostly younger students like the middle schoolers,” said Marutani.

High-school students around campus said they are hearing about Fortnite a lot less and finding that its popularity is favored amongst the younger students. 

“It’s a leisure activity and it can take away time from actual homework because it’s so fun,” said Juliano. 

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Fortnite: Wildly popular online game could be fading at Mid-Pacific